5/29/2015 — USGS Responds on Northern California 5.1Magnitude Earthquake — Calling it a “mistake”

This morning, a 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck along the shores of Alaska.  Directly following the Alaska event, several minutes later, a 5.1M earthquake was reported in Northern California.

california 5.1m earthquake may 29 2015

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The 5.1M earthquake showed up several minutes AFTER the large earthquake in Alaska, and was recorded to have occurred directly at the Trinity Lake Dam, near Mount Shasta Volcano (recorded by multiple agencies including the USGS + EMSC).

powerhouse road trinity lake may 29 2015

lassen volcanic complex may 29 2015

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Strangely, the Europeans reported this earthquake , but the USGS says it was “nothing” (even though they recorded it at this location as well).

Even more strange, the media reports on this REMOVAL of the earthquake from the feeds…. the reports below comes across as quite odd.

I really  love how they LEAVE OUT the main nearby location (Mount Shasta volcano), and LEAVE OUT THE DAM being the epicenter location of the earthquake from the story!  In both stories no less.

Finally to top it off.. they say because no one reported ‘feeling it’ that it must not have occurred.

In other news, if a tree falls in the woods, and no one is there to hear it, surely it makes no sound! 😛 SMH + Facepalm = DERP!

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From main stream media here:

USGS Mistakenly Reports 5.1-Magnitude Earthquake Near Redding, Calif.

http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/51-Magnitude-Earthquake-Strikes-Redding-Calif-305449801.html

“The US Geological Survey erroneously reported that an earthquake with a magnitude of 5.1 struck about 25 miles north of Redding in Northern California just after midnight on Friday.

That’s because the USGS issued the alert based off a 6.7-M earthquake that struck in Alaska.

That would make sense, according to Trinity County Officer J. Morrel, who confirmed his agency got a state alert about the quake, but that no one called to report feeling it. “I believe we would have,” he said.

The alert said the quake was centered near Redding in Trinity County’s Lewiston, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s map.

No one felt anything in nearby Redding, either. “We didn’t even feel it,” said a Trinity County dispatcher.

By coincidence, the mistaken USGS report came out on the same day as the Hollywood fictional account of “San Andreas,” a disaster earthquake film  premieres.”

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USGS, LA Times ‘Quakebot’ Mistakenly Report Magnitude 5.1 Earthquake Near Redding

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/05/29/usgs-mistakenly-reports-magnitude-5-1-earthquake-near-redding/

“REDDING (CBS SF) – An earthquake with magnitude of 5.1 was reported but never hit the Redding area overnight.

The United States Geological Survey reported the quake just after midnight, seven miles outside of Lewiston, just under Buckeye Ridge at Clair Engle Lake.

But the Associated Press confirmed Friday morning that this was a “…erroneous alert based off an earthquake that struck in Alaska.”

The event record of the California quake has since vanished from the USGS seismic activity map.

The USGS now shows no Northern California quakes over magnitude 2.5 in the last 24 hours. (USGS)

Around the same time, a magnitude 6.7 quake was recorded off an island in southwest Alaska.

As of 9 a.m., the computer algorithm used to automatically “write” earthquake stories for the Los Angeles Times continued to list the quake as a recorded event.

Quakebot reports a Redding earthquake that never happened. (LA Times)

“Quakebot is programmed to extract the relevant data from the USGS report and plug it into a pre-written template. The story goes into the LAT’s content management system, where it awaits review and publication by a human editor,” Slate reported in a 2014 article about the newspaper’s use of the computerized journalism technology.

Journalist and programmer Ken Schwencke designed “Quakebot,” but left the Times in 2014.

The article with headline and excerpt describing the sizeable earthquake continue to exist on the LATimes.com website, but a paragraph has since been added a few paragraphs into the post, reading: “10:57 a.m.: This post is incorrect, with the USGS reporting that sensors in California misidentified seismic activity from a magnitude 6.7 quake that struck earlier in Alaska. The USGS reported there was no earthquake in the area at the time reported.”

CBS SF has reached out to the LA Times for comment on the Quakebot system and how updates to USGS earthquake reports are handled by the computerized news publishing system.

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